The Danner Rivercomber Is Our New Favorite Do-It-All Wet Wading Shoe

By Tony K

Photos by Wild Human

Summer is a few weeks away and that means wet wading season. I can’t think of too many better things than wading through a cool river on a hot day with light tackle. 

Patagonia’s Foot Tractor is a beast under foot. Their River Salt Boot is lighter and better suited for longer hikes and wet wading, but it’s still pretty beefy.

If you’re looking for a lighter wet wading shoe for sand flats or small streams, check-out the new Danner Rivercomber.

Danner has released other wading boots in the past, but this sneaker style water shoe marks a first for the Portland, OR based brand.

The Rivercomber is definitely more of a water shoe than a boot, but that’s why I like it. It’s light, comfortable, and holds up against abuse in the water.

While Danner seems to position the Rivercomber as a general recreational water shoe, it works well for fishing in smaller water and on sand flats. It’s also a great option for any type of water activity like kayaking or paddle boarding.

Splashing through the water while carrying a kayak

I’ve had other water shoes from big brands and usually end up with raging blisters. So far, the Rivercomber is keeping my feet blister free. They’re one of the more comfortable water shoes that I’ve tried, bested only by my trusty Chaco Zs.

The fit around my ankle is secure but not too tight. My Chacos let in a lot of dirt and gravel which requires a fair amount of stops throughout the day to clean them out. The Rivercomber seems to do a better job at keeping my foot clear on the trail and in the water.

The Rivercomber outsole uses Vibram’s Wavegrip technology which channels water away from the sole, increasing the grip on wet surfaces.

Walking through the water carrying a kayak while wearing the Rivercomber show

The Bottom Line

As the weather heats up, I’m finding myself reaching for the Rivercomber more and more. For such a light shoe, the outsole does a reasonably good job of keeping my foot stable in the water. However, I recommend a wader boot, like the Patagonia Foot Tractor boots, or more substantial wet wading shoe if you’re navigating bigger rocks and faster currents. And, at $120, you’re right in the range of other wet wading shoes. Not a bad deal for a shoe you can wear all summer long.

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